Coal ‘isn’t going anywhere,’ industry head says

Coal ‘isn’t going anywhere,’ industry head says

By Timothy Cama – 11/11/15 10:13 AM EST The head of the coal industry’s international association said coal will remain a significant fuel source, despite predictions otherwise. Benjamin Sporton, head of the World Coal Association, told the Guardian that Asia especially still has a significant appetite for the cheap and accessible power coal provides. “There is an assumption we can

Moffat County and Craig take stands against domestic violence

Moffat County and Craig take stands against domestic violence

October 1, 2015 Patrick Kelly, Craig Daily Press In an effort to bring attention to the issue of domestic violence, Advocates Crisis Support Services invited community members to join in a national moment of silence for victims Thursday morning in Craig. During the one minute moment of silence outside of Moffat County Courthouse, a purple

EPA takes heat for toxic wastewater spill that turns Colorado river orange

EPA takes heat for toxic wastewater spill that turns Colorado river orange

People kayak in the Animas River near Durango, Colo., on Aug. 6, 2015, in water colored from a mine waste spill. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said that a cleanup team was working with heavy equipment Wednesday to secure an entrance to the Gold King Mine. Workers instead released an estimated 1 million gallons of

Colorado toxic river spill: EPA has gone from ‘good guys’ to enemy of average Americans

Colorado toxic river spill: EPA has gone from ‘good guys’ to enemy of average Americans

Grace: (noun) An act or instance of kindness, courtesy or clemency.  Mercy, pardon. Here in northwest Colorado we feel like we’re at the epicenter of federal policy actions with regard to land and the environment.  When you think of the war on coal, we are the bullseye.  The irony is that we are the true

EPA hears testimony on proposed carbon emissions rules

EPA hears testimony on proposed carbon emissions rules

DENVER | The atmosphere outside was festive, with music, free T-shirts and ice cream giveaways, but the mood inside the Environmental Protection Agency’s first hearings on its proposed power plant regulations was anything but. Hundreds of people testified Tuesday in three cities — Atlanta, Denver and Washington, D.C. — on the Obama administration’s proposed rules